How Can Professors Help Students with Mental Health Concerns?

This post was co-written with clinical psychology graduate student and Jedi Counsel podcast co-host, Brandon Saxton.

Disclaimer: Policies, procedures, and resources vary by university, so it’s important to check with your own university and to defer to those over our recommendations.mental-2470926_960_720

In the early 1900s, faculty and staff at Princeton University noticed that several students were dropping out of school due to mental health problems. They sought to prevent this by creating the first campus mental health program in 1910. Since then, it has become standard practice to offer counseling along with physical health services on college campuses. For a fascinating overview of this history, we recommend reading this Kraft (2011) article. Here’s a sample excerpt:


Professors often serve as an initial contact for students with mental health concerns. Some students are unaware of the available resources and reach out to professors to point them in the right direction, while others feel more comfortable checking in with a professor before seeking help from someone they don’t know.

We’ll start with some general guidelines for assisting students when they approach you for help:

  1. Listen to and assess the nature of the problem in a nonjudgmental fashion. Asking about mental health is typically beneficial for people experiencing problems and does not generally have a detrimental effect on people who aren’t experiencing them (e.g., 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7).
  2. Respond with compassion and acknowledge their concerns. This can provide a sense of hope and validation.
  3. Refer them to appropriate services for their needs (more on this below). When in doubt, choose the services that seem most fitting. If it turns out that the student doesn’t need services or requires a different resource, the specialists at the initial referral source will know how to best proceed.

To expand on step #3, we have listed some of the most common scenarios below:

Worry about mental health symptoms: We usually start with recommending the on-campus counseling services for students. Depending on a variety of factors (e.g., the severity of the problem, their insurance coverage), they may also be interested in off-campus recommendations. We typically give them the link for the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies website to find therapists who use scientifically-informed practices. If you or the student are unsure about whether the student’s issues warrant intervention, you can assure them that the first step in mental health care is to undergo an evaluation to answer that question and then formulate a plan based on the findings. If they are reluctant to go to the counseling center, we will sometimes offer to walk over there with them or tell them that we understand and that those services will be available when they are ready. If appropriate, we also provide students with information for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline.

Displaying unusual/worrisome behavior: If a student is exhibiting odd or potentially harmful behavior (e.g., their assignments have violent or suicidal content, they are showing up to class intoxicated, they seem disoriented), then you can typically contact a Behavioral Intervention Team on your campus for guidance. Behavioral Intervention Teams are composed of individuals who represent different components of the campus community (e.g., residence life, student affairs, faculty, law enforcement, counseling center, etc.) and provide consultation, advice, and follow-up with students who need it.

Class accommodations request: Sometimes, students will ask for accommodations without the required formal paperwork. In these cases, it’s important to refer the student to the campus counseling center or the disabilities office, so that they can go through a formal assessment process rather than leaving it up to your own discretion. If students tell us about a life circumstance that affected their ability to complete an assignment, and it’s a one- or two-time incident, we’ll typically allow them to make up the work. However, when the request is more long-term in nature or requiring special accommodations that may be unfair to other students, it’s important to defer to the experts in the disabilities office to make the decisions.

Harassment/discrimination: If a student tells you that they have experienced harassment or discrimination, you should take time to listen attentively, sympathize, and then refer them to the office that handles Title IX issues. We strongly recommend visiting your university website for that office, so that you are familiar with the most up-to-date mandated reporting guidelines and the processes for filing complaints. Here again, if you are unsure whether something rises to the level of harassment or discrimination, it’s important (and sometimes mandated) that you report it to the appropriate office so that they can use their specialized training to make a determination (rather than your own judgment).

In summary, we recommend expressing that you care while also recognizing your boundaries as a professor. You should not act as their therapist, but you can help by connecting them with one. Professors have the power to create an educational environment that reduces mental health stigma and increases students’ willingness to seek help when they need it. We try to communicate this to students by showing that we welcome their questions, providing them with mental health resource information in class, announcing mental health-related community events, and treating such topics with care. As a testament to the positive influence a professor can have through these strategies, look at this letter that Dr. Jeffrey Cohen received from one of his students (thanks to Rob Gordon for sharing it).

Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions, concerns, or corrections. We’ll conclude by linking to two informative articles and our podcast episode on the topic, which goes into more detail. Thank you for reading!

  1. Graduate Students Need More Mental Health Support, New Study Highlights by Elisabeth Pain
  2. The Myth of the Ever-More Fragile College Student by Jesse Singal




A Note on the Tragedy at Douglas High School


All school shootings are heartbreaking. The one at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School hits close to home. I grew up in the town neighboring Parkland. I have seen many of my friends from high school express similar sentiments: Douglas was our “rival” high school, but we all got to know each other in middle school and were friends. We hurt for our friends. Most of us still have connections with the area. Our family and friends live there. We can vividly picture the details revealed in the news because we’ve been in those locations. Most of us remember being there without fear that a mass shooting like this could ever occur.

For parents who lost their children in the shooting, this must be an absolute gut-wrenching nightmare. I hear my parent friends saying that they worry about mass shootings when they send their kids off to school. The things that they used to tell themselves to reduce their worry (e.g., we live in a safe town, the school prepares with active shooter drills, the school has security in place, armed resource officers are on campus) start to lose their power when a mass shooting like the one at Douglas happens. The fact that school shootings are statistically rare in an individual risk sense provides little comfort to concerned parents. All children deserve to go to school in safe places, and parents shouldn’t feel like they’re putting their kids in harm’s way simply by sending them to get an education.

For the family, friends, and people directly affected by gun violence of all kinds…no words suffice. I have nothing but compassion, sympathy, and motivation to do my part to address this painful problem. The loss of a child is unfathomable, and I send nothing but love your way. I will conclude with two suggestions for coping, in case they’re helpful to anyone.


In the face of painful emotions, it can be tempting to withdraw and isolate oneself…to avoid processing or thinking about hurtful realities. While taking time to oneself and breaks from tragic news are components of healthy coping, it’s important to balance that out with taking time to connect with others about your feelings. Interpersonal connections are crucial to good mental and physical health. Communicating with others during stressful times helps to remind us that we’re not alone in our experiences, that we have people who we can depend on, and that there are many kind people out in the world. The American Psychological Association’s press release provides additional resources for coping in the face of this tragedy.


This Twitter thread spoke to me. It says that we must act in the face of tragedy 1) to reduce the number of people who are victims in the future and 2) to show our children that we care enough to keep trying. When we take action, it can provide hope in times of despair – for ourselves and for others. Over 10,000 people have already joined a Mobilizing Marjory Stoneman Douglas Facebook group. Over 100 mental health professionals in Florida have said they’re willing to donate time to provide therapy for Douglas students and their families. There is a benefit concert being organized to help victims’ families. There is a fund to help Marjory Stoneman Douglas victims. Students and teachers who survived are courageously speaking out, organizing groups, and planning rallies and marches. People are pulling together to contribute what they can with their diverse resources and talents.

Let’s remember these students and staff and find ways to honor them. Let’s lean on each other for support in the wake of this tragedy.

What Can We Learn about Suicide from S-Town?


It’s been over five months since S-Town, the Serial podcast series, was first released. It captivated so many listeners with its compelling story about a bright, unique, complicated man named John McLemore. Even though the major media hype about the show has kind of passed, I chose to write about S-Town in honor of World Suicide Prevention Day. My goals are to highlight some of the main risk factors featured in S-Town, to place them in the context of related empirical research, and to increase awareness about suicide prevention resources. If you want to avoid spoilers for S-Town, please stop here, go listen to it in rapid succession, and then come back in 7+ hours to read the rest.

As a bit of background information, I listened to all of S-Town in two or three days. The first time I listened to it was all about being absorbed in John’s story – experiencing all of the painful aspects, struggling with mixed feelings as complexities were revealed, and fitting puzzle pieces together. I walked away from it for a few days to process my emotions and thoughts about it all. Then, I listened to it a second time through the lens of a suicide prevention researcher and identified risk factors that I think may have contributed to John’s tragic death. My understanding of John is limited by what the folks at S-Town chose to include in their framing of his story in their seven episodes. In addition, I am attempting to extract general suicide risk factors from one person’s story (as best as I can I know it) and that necessarily involves speculation. With those limitations in mind, I have listed some of the risk factors below:

Demographic variables. John’s age (49), race (White), and sex (male) placed him in the highest risk group for suicide in 2015, the year that he died. Alabama has a suicide rate that is somewhat higher (15.1/100,000) than the national average (13.8/100,000). John also told Brian Reed that his sexual orientation was “semi-homosexual” and suggested that he was secretive about it to avoid discrimination. Research with lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth suggests that they have higher suicide attempt rates than their heterosexual peers, and that this is linked to more frequent exposure to stressful experiences (e.g., stigma, being threatened with violence, institutional discrimination). These stressors may have been particularly prevalent where John lived. As a reflection of the local attitudes, S-Town points out that the county that John lived in refused to issue same-sex marriage licenses following the Supreme Court decision to legalize same-sex marriage nationwide. Importantly, there is evidence that less discriminatory state law is associated with fewer suicide attempts.

Mood disturbance. John told Brian, “I guess if I sound like I’m disinterested today, it’s firstly because I’m tired and wore-ass out. And secondly because, you know, I just—I’m not the most cheerful person. You know, I spend most spare time now either studying energy or climate change, and it’s not looking good. So yes, sometimes it’s hard for me to get focused back on something when the whole goddamned Arctic summer sea ice is going to be gone by 2017. And we’re fixing to have heat waves in Siberia this year, and sometimes I feel like a total idiot because I’m worried about a goddamn crackhead out here in fucking Shittown, Alabama. So yeah, that’s just a personality disorder of mine. You know, sometimes when you call me, I’m kind of in an upbeat mood. And sometimes, like today, you caught me in one of these tired, somber, you know, reflective moods, where I’ve been, you know, sitting there mulling over climate change for about the past 10 damned hours.”  That quote is characteristic of many of John’s quotes with similar themes throughout the series. Relatedly, Brian makes an observation about John in the first episode, “No positive comment, no matter how innocuous, survives his virtuosic negativity.” However, John’s long-time friends later tell Brian that John used to be “idealistic” and joyously participated in community events (e.g., the Christmas parade). Per their report, he had not become consistently irritable and dysphoric until closer to his death.

While it appeared that John had long struggled with untreated mood problems (with the exception of brief treatment for depression in college), the series posited that his condition deteriorated markedly over time due to mercury exposure. Brian presents compelling evidence that John may have been experiencing “mad hatter syndrome” and it is presented as a primary factor in his suicide. John knew the dangers of mercury exposure, but chose to continue working with it without safety precautions. It is unclear if this choice was due to a devotion for utilizing what he viewed as the best approach to fix antique clocks, if it was some kind of neglectful, self-destructive behavior related to his mood problems, or both.

While mercury exposure in itself is rare in modern times, mood disturbances and mood disorders (regardless of cause) generally increase the risk for suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Therefore, it’s of the utmost importance to seek evidence-based treatments to effectively combat mental health problems, prevent suicide, and to improve quality of life.


Loneliness. John also told Brian, “But I think the thing that’s happened is I’ve gotten myself in an almost prison of my own making, where all my friends have died off. Because I only had contact with people much older than me. Even when I was a kid in school, I didn’t want to hang around other kids. Because kids are talking about getting girls, or deer hunting, or football. Whereas I was interested in the astrolabe, sundials, projective geometry, new age music, climate change, and how to solve Rubik’s cube.” This quote and others like it (including John discussing his romantic hardships) suggest that John felt he was alone, which is a major risk factor for suicide. One of many surprising turns in S-Town occurs when Brian learned that John actually had a number of people that cared about him. He also had a solid group of friends that he spoke to on a fairly regular basis. John was arguably closest to Tyler at the end of his life and apparently begged him to not leave him alone on the night that he ended his life. This happened right after they had spent the whole day together affirming how much they meant to one another. This speaks to a key, painful point about suicide – feeling disconnected from others leads people to want to end their life EVEN if they actually are loved by many people.

Hopelessness. John blamed himself for his misery and attributed it to never leaving Woodstock, Alabama (i.e., S-Town). He expressed insight when he told Brian, “I need to get out of my depression. I need to get over this attitude problem I’ve got, that nothing can be done.” In the last decade of John’s life, he faced multiple stressors that could have contributed to his sense of hopelessness: his dad died, he had a falling out with a close friend, he was heartbroken when the man he loved stopped returning his calls, and he was caring for his aging mother. He also seemed to suffer from a broader sense of hopelessness about the injustices of the world related to climate change, the legal system, and a variety of other issues. He expressed a particular pain in feeling like he was the only one so upset about it all. The combination of pain and hopelessness are particularly linked to suicidal desire. Finding ways to build real hope (e.g., through connecting a person to a mental health professional) can be important for decreasing suicide risk.

Plans and preparations for suicide. Most of John’s friends knew that he planned on killing himself at some point. He spoke of his suicide plans matter-of-factly, kept a lengthy suicide note on his computer, left a list of people to contact after his death, and had access to lethal means for suicide. John’s resolved plans and preparation were particularly dangerous in light of his apparent fearlessness about suicide. Many more people consider suicide than ever attempt or die by suicide, in part, because of a survival instinct that protects people from acting on suicidal thoughts. Under these circumstances, one powerful suicide prevention action is to remove their access to lethal means (e.g., store their gun, pills, or other possible means safely).

Nonsuicidal self-injury.  Toward the end of S-Town, we discover that John went from despising tattoos and piercings to asking Tyler to regularly tattoo and pierce him. Eventually, John was covered in tattoos and would ask Tyler to pierce and re-pierce him and even use the tattoo needle on him without any ink. Tyler told Brian that he thought it was John’s version of cutting, with the purpose of distracting from emotional pain with physical pain. In my opinion, based on the information available, it sounded like a form of nonsuicidal self-injury. Tattoos and piercings are not typically considered nonsuicidal self-injury because they are culturally sanctioned, but the way that John experienced them was atypical and extreme. Nonsuicidal self-injury is associated with higher suicide risk, and this connection is thought to be, at least in part, due to the experience of nonsuicidal self-injury increasing an individual’s pain tolerance while reducing fear about self-inflicted harm.

In the interest of keeping this post relatively brief, I focused on what I view as some of the major risk factors for suicide present in S-Town. There is so much more to John’s story. One of the most moving and painful components of S-Town was hearing John’s loved ones struggle with his death. Many of them experienced self-blame, regret, and wondered if they could have done anything else to prevent it – all feelings that are common for people who have lost someone to suicide.

I thank you for taking the time to read this post. Below are some suicide prevention resources that I hope you find useful:

-The American Association of Suicidology website has a list of warning signs.

-The National Suicide Prevention lifeline has contact information for people in crisis.

-The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention has tips for helping someone who is at risk for suicide.


Logic Performs a Suicide Prevention Song at the VMAs

I’m quite certain that I’m no longer in the target audience for the MTV Video Music Awards (VMAs). Fortunately, I found out about an incredibly moving VMA performance through the American Association of Suicidology listserv. I have never seen any other live performance like it. Logic, Alessia Cara, and Khalid performed a song named after the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: “1-800-273-8255”. It has raw lyrics from the perspective of someone experiencing suicidal ideation. In my work, I have heard people express sentiments just like those in the song. It feels real to me – the painful and hopeful aspects don’t feel sugar-coated or contrived.

That, in and of itself, likely reduces some of the stigma associated with suicidal thoughts. But, Logic went even further for the VMAs. He contacted a mental health organization and asked suicide attempt survivors to be part of the performance. During the song, the cameras show a diverse group of people who have survived suicide attempts standing with shirts that have the Lifeline phone number on the front and “You are not alone,” on the back. “You are not alone,” is a powerful message that specifically speaks to a major risk factor for suicide: loneliness. While there are demographic differences in the overall rates of suicidal behavior, people of all backgrounds can be affected by suicide. It was a powerful visual display of many individuals, each with their own journeys, standing together as survivors.

In addition to however many people saw the performance live, the youtube video has been viewed over 3 million times in 3 days (only 2 million were my views). All of those people probably have the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline memorized.

I am curious whether more people reached out to the Lifeline following the VMAs. This is a question that could be partially addressed through their call center data (update: it appears the call volume did increase) or perhaps via Google search trends (which was one useful tool in examining how 13 Reasons Why impacted its audience). It seems likely that this type of widely-viewed content impacts people and their perceptions of mental health. I am grateful that Logic chose to use his platform in a responsible, compassionate way.

Teaching About Mental Health through Music

Clinical psychology graduate student, Samantha Myhre, and I bonded a few years ago over our love of music. We both like to see live shows and get super-close to the stage. For example, here are some pictures Samantha has taken:


Eddie Vedder on the left; Chris Cornell on the right

And a few I have taken:


Aesop Rock on the left; Against Me! on the right



The connections we each have personally with music (discussed in more detail in this podcast episode) carried over to our Abnormal Psychology classes. We both found that adding class activities with music components engaged undergraduate students. Anecdotally, they enjoyed looking more deeply into lyrics than they had in the past. Some also said they experienced increased compassion and comprehension for mental disorder symptoms through the connection to music.

I posted our combined list of mental health-related songs below in case it’s helpful for people teaching these topics. If you have any that you think should be added, please let us know!


  • 19th Nervous Breakdown (by The Rolling Stones)
  • If I Ever Feel Better (by Phoenix)
  • Breathe (by U2)
  • Flagpole Sitta (by Harvey Danger)
  • Intro to Anxiety (by Hoodie Allen)

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder:

  • Wrong (by Depeche Mode)
  • A.D.H.D. (by Kendrick Lamar)
  • Epiphany (by Staind)
  • Bouncing Around the Room (by Phish)

Autism Spectrum:

  • We’ll Get By (The Autism Song) (by Johnny Orr Band)
  • So It Goes (by various artists and parents)
  • Missing Pieces (by Mark Leland/Tim Calhoun)
  • I’m In Here (the anthem for autism – written from perspective of child with autism

Bipolar Disorder:

  • Manic (by Plumb)
  • Bi-Polar Bear (by Stone Temple Pilots)
  • Manic Depression (by Jimi Hendrix)
  • Lithium (by Nirvana)
  • Secrets (by Mary Lambert)
  • Down In It (by Nine Inch Nails)
  • Given to Fly (by Pearl Jam)
  • Everybody Cares, Everybody Understands (by Elliot Smith)
  • I Go To Extremes (by Billy Joel)
  • One Step Up (by Bruce Springsteen)


  • Fell on Black Days (by Soundgarden)
  • Cleaning my Gun (by Chris Cornell)
  • Hurt (by Nine Inch Nails)
  • Lithium (by Nirvana)
  • Save Me (by Ryan Adams)
  • Today (by The Smashing Pumpkins)
  • Sway (by The Rolling Stones)
  • Turn Blue (by The Black Keys)
  • Twilight (by Vanessa Carlton)
  • Come Around (by Counting Crows)
  • Lost Cause (by Beck)
  • You Know You’re Right (by Nirvana)
  • Oh My Sweet Carolina (by Ryan Adams & Emmylou Harris)
  • Philadelphia (by Bruce Springsteen)
  • Someone Saved My Life Tonight (by Elton John)
  • Spaceman (by The Killers)
  • Go Tell Everybody (by The Horrible Crowes)
  • Danko/Manuel (by Drive-By Truckers/Jason Isbell)
  • Fade to Black (by Metallica)
  • Nutshell (by Alice in Chains)
  • Keep Steppin’ (by Atmosphere)
  • Adam’s Song (by Blink 182)
  • Whiskey Lullaby (by Brad Paisley & Allison Krauss)
  • Screaming Infidelities (by Dashboard Confessional)
  • Rhyme & Reason (by Dave Matthews Band)
  • Gotta Find Peace of Mind (by Lauryn Hill)
  • Creep (by Radiohead)
  • Everybody Hurts (by R.E.M.)
  • So Many Tears (by Tupac Shakur)
  • Dark Times (by The Weeknd)
  • Electro-Shock Blues (by Eels)
  • Quiet Times (by Dido)
  • Comfortably Numb (by Pink Floyd)
  • Hate Me (by Blue October)
  • Girl With Broken Wings (by Manchester Orchestra)
  • Jumper (by Third Eye Blind)
  • Miss Misery (by Elliott Smith)
  • Best I Ever Had (by Gary Allan)
  • A Picture of Me (Without You) (by George Jones)
  • Behind Blue Eyes (by The Who)
  • One of Four (hidden track, end of Maintenance by Aesop Rock)
  • Down in a Hole (by Alice in Chains)
  • Keep Steppin’ (by Atmosphere)
  • Picket Fence (by Brother Ali)
  • Rain Water (by Brother Ali)
  • Sullen Girl (by Fiona Apple)
  • That Hump (by Erykah Badu)
  • Rock Bottom (by Eminem)
  • Boulevard of Broken Dreams (by Green Day)
  • Moonshine (by the Gift of Gab)
  • Mad World (by Tears for Fears)
  • Black Clouds (by Papa Roach)
  • Trouble in Mind (by Nina Simone)
  • Much Finer (by Le Tigre)

Eating Disorders:

  • Ana’s Song (Open Fire; by Silverchair)
  • Demons (by Imagine Dragons)

Intellectual Disabilities:

  • This Isn’t Disneyland (by The Sisters of Intervention)
  • I Am (by Liz Longley)
  • We’re Just the Same (by Terry Vital)

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder:

  • Monster (by Paul Walters) is a song by Paul Walters who was on A&Es Obsessed. This song was created after his decade long battle with OCD
  • Ana’s Song (by Silverchair) does a nice job of highlighting compulsions)
  • Obsessions (by Marina and the Diamonds)

Panic Disorder/Panic:

  • Be Calm (by fun.)
  • If the Brakeman Turns My Way (by Bright Eyes)
  • Circus Galop (by Marc-André Hamelin)

Positive Body Image:

  • Nobody’s Perfect (by Hannah Montana – nice Disney Channel throwback)
  • Stay Beautiful (by Taylor Swift)
  • All About That Bass (by Meghan Trainor)
  • Dumb Blonde (by Dolly Parton)
  • Just the Way You Are (by Bruno Mars)
  • What Makes You Beautiful (by One Direction)
  • Try (by Colbie Caillat)
  • Fat Bottomed Girls (by Queen)
  • Born This Way (by Lady Gaga)
  • Beautiful (by Christina Aguilera)
  • Flawless (by Beyonce)
  • You’re Beautiful (by James Blunt)
  • F**kin’ Perfect (by P!nk)
  • Beautiful (by John Mayer)
  • Hips Don’t Lie (by Shakira)
  • Fight Song (by Rachel Platten)
  • Love Me (by Katy Perry)
  • On My Own (by Miley Cyrus)
  • Unpretty (by TLC)
  • Feelin’ Myself (by Nicki Minaj ft. Beyonce)
  • My Kind of Woman (by Justin Moore)
  • I’d Want It to Be Yours (by Justin Moore)
  • The Perfect Woman (by Bo Burnham)

Here‘s a playlist my class made with positive body image songs.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder/Trauma:

  • Wrong Side of Heaven (by Five Finger Death Punch)
  • Hidden Wounds (by dEUS)
  • Drum + Fife (by Smashing Pumpkins)

Schizophrenia/Psychotic Symptoms:

  • Jump They Say (by the late and great David Bowie) was a song written about Bowie’s brother who had schizophrenia and died by suicide while experiencing auditory hallucinations
  • Basket Case (by Green Day)
  • Is There a Ghost (by Band of Horses) is about Band of Horses member Ben Bridwell’s experiences with paranoia
  • Annabelle (by Dessa)
  • Shine On You Crazy Diamond (by Pink Floyd)
  • Going Crazy (by Jean Grae)

Social Anxiety:

  • Social Anxiety (by Nicola Elias)
  • The Quiet One (by The Who)
  • Things the Grandchildren Should Know (by Eels)

Substance Use:

  • Everyone’s At It (by Lily Allen)
  • Never Did (by Perfume Genius)
  • Sober (by P!nk)
  • Not If You Were The Last Junkie On Earth (by The Dandy Warhols):
  • Needle and the Damage Done (by Neil Young)
  • Under the Bridge (by Red Hot Chili Peppers)
  • Rehab (by the late Amy Winehouse)
  • Detox Mansion (by Warren Zevon)
  • Cover Me Up (by Jason Isbell)
  • Super 8 (by Jason Isbell)
  • Choices (by George Jones)
  • Stockholm (by Jason Isbell)
  • Starting Over (by Macklemore & Ryan Lewis)
  • Amazing (by Aerosmith)
  • That Smell (by Lynyrd Skynyrd)
  • Gravity (by A Perfect Circle)
  • Numb (by Alanis Morissette)
  • Save You (by Pearl Jam)
  • You’re Gone (by Diamond Rio)
  • Sunloathe (by Wilco)
  • Unforgiven (by Hal Ketchum)
  • Uncle Johnny (by The Killers)
  • Drug Ballad (by Eminem)
  • The Man I Knew (by Dessa)
  • Habits (Stay High, by Tove Lo)


  • Asleep (by The Smiths)
  • The Ledge (by The Replacements)
  • Vincent (by Don McClean)
  • King’s Crossing (by Elliott Smith)
  • Suicidal Thoughts (by Notorious B.I.G.)
  • Last Resort (by Papa Roach)
  • Like Suicide (by Soundgarden)
  • The Great Escape (by P!nk)
  • Hold On (by Good Charlotte)
  • Don’t Try Suicide (by Queen)
  • 1-800-273-8255 (by Logic)
  • Out of Here (by Brother Ali)
  • Moment of Truth (by Gang Starr)
  • Jeremy (by Pearl Jam)
  • Coming Apart (by Friends of Emmet)
  • The Pretender (by Jackson Browne)
  • Keep Livin’ (by Jean Grae)
  • Keep on Livin’ (by Le Tigre)

Here‘s a playlist my class made with songs that give them hope when they’re feeling down.

While I have you here thinking about mental health and music, I recommend checking out Dessa:


Congratulations to Dr. Kwan & Dr. Minnich!


Congratulations to Dr. Mun Yee Kwan & Dr. Allison Minnich for completing their doctorates in clinical psychology! After their internships, Dr. Kwan will be an Assistant Professor at West Texas A & M University, while Dr. Minnich will be a clinician at the Chicago Cognitive Behavioral Treatment Center! It was an honor to serve as their advisor, and I couldn’t be prouder of them on their graduation day! The world gained two fantastic clinical psychologists!


A Note to Chris Cornell Fans from a Chris Cornell Fan


Chris Cornell in Minneapolis, October 2015 (photo credit: Samantha Myhre)

When I learned about Chris Cornell’s death this morning, I was filled with disbelief and sadness. Chris was a remarkable musician

and a humanitarian.


When I learned that he died by suicide, I couldn’t help but think back to how painful it was to learn of Kurt Cobain’s death by suicide years ago.


a bench turned memorial outside of Kurt Cobain’s former house

If someone you don’t know can have such an impact on your life, it’s hard to fathom how much pain Chris’ loved ones are experiencing right now. My heart goes out to them. I hope they receive all of the support, respect, and privacy they need in the face of their tragic loss.

There will be (and already are) amazing pieces dedicated to Chris’ legacy as a musician, as a humanitarian, and his personal impact in his roles as a friend, father, and husband.

What I want to focus on here is something that came to mind as I recalled MTV’s interviews with people about their reactions to Kurt’s death. In particular, I was thinking about people who had suffered from their own mental health problems and looked to Kurt as a symbol of hope. I know there were people who looked at Chris, who had been open about past mental health struggles, in the same way. When you see someone you look up to survive and thrive in the face of mental health struggles – it’s inspiring. When you lose that person, it can dampen your own hope.

To the Chris Cornell fans out there:

First, I am so very sorry for your loss and all of the hurt that goes with it.

Secondly, I want you to know that mental health problems are treatable and that suicide is preventable. Please take care of yourself – reach out for help and support. There is strength in seeking help, and mental health struggles are nothing to be ashamed of. You matter – please stay.*

For information about suicide warning signs and suicide prevention, please go to the American Association of Suicidology website.

A useful resource for finding mental health help can be found here.

If you are having thoughts about suicide, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline.


*#STAY is a t-shirt campaign for suicide prevention started by Live Through This. You can find out more about it here.