Red River Psychology Conference 2016

Undergraduate research assistants, Zoe Citrowske Lee and Branden Smith, presented research from our lab at the 30th Annual Red River Psychology Conference. Zoe’s project examined suicide risk among undergraduate students who belong to ethnic minority groups, while Branden’s project examined the relationships between different facets of emotion regulation difficulties and nonsuicidal self-injury. They did an excellent job sharing our research with conference attendees (see pictures below)!
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Advice for Aspiring Professors

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my colleague, Professor Erin Conwell

Last month, I wrote a post describing my tips for graduate school success. A student suggested that it would be helpful to have a follow-up post featuring advice about becoming a professor, and I thought that was a great idea. As you read through my recommendations for aspiring professors, please keep a few things in mind. First, disciplines, universities, and departments all vary in terms of what they look for when they are hiring. Most of my experience and knowledge come from psychology departments in the U.S. with a primary focus on research and a secondary focus on teaching. Therefore, my advice may be most applicable to people seeking out those types of jobs. Second, most graduate students are already aware that publications are a major way that job applicants are evaluated for professor positions in research-focused departments. Therefore, I have not included direct advice on publishing below, even though it is undeniably an important part of being a competitive job applicant for these types of positions and should be prioritized. Finally, many people take postdoctoral positions before applying to work as a professor and that provides additional opportunities to gain experience in the areas described below.

Programmatic Research When making hiring decisions, faculty select applicants who are likely to succeed at establishing an active research program in their department. One way to increase their confidence in your ability to do that is to have a specific plan for the types of research that you will pursue both in the short-term and the long-term. If you demonstrate that you have a program of research with well-articulated, theory-driven, and well-formed research questions propelling your work, you will be a strong applicant. Alternatively, applicants who have disconnected, poorly planned, and impractical ideas will not be as competitive. 

My advice for graduate students is to think about conceptualizing your research in a programmatic way when preparing your job application materials and job talk (a presentation of your research that most interviews include). I suggest asking to see other people’s materials as samples and consulting with faculty for feedback as you prepare your own. Every piece of work (e.g., publications, presentations) that you have done does not have to fit within one theme, but it helps if you can tie your past, present, and future work together with a (or a few) overriding theme(s).

Grant potential It is also typically important that you demonstrate the ability to obtain grant funding for your work. You can do this by 1) getting a grant in graduate school (they don’t have to be major grants, smaller within-university or department grants can be helpful in this regard), 2) applying for an external grant (e.g., through the National Institute of Health or the National Science Foundation) even if it is not funded, and 3) showing that you have knowledge about grants (e.g., specific ideas about the types that you will pursue once hired).

My recommendation for graduate students is to prepare for your job application and interview by actively seeking out grant information through specialized workshops, research mentors, and websites for relevant funding agencies, which often have tutorials available. It is especially helpful, as I mentioned above, to gain experience by actually applying for grants. Even if your grant applications are not funded, it still reflects positively on you that you applied. You should understand the main types of grants that you would be eligible for and the types of projects that tend to be prioritized for funding.

Teaching potential Job applicants are also usually evaluated on their ability to teach effectively and to fill department needs. You can present evidence that you will be a good teacher through 1) positive ratings and comments from students for previously taught courses , 2) job application materials expressing enthusiasm and citing sources of specific knowledge about teaching (e.g., classes taken about teaching), and 3) letters of recommendation that positively reflect on teaching-related skills. If you are invited for an interview, you can also demonstrate your potential through positive interactions with the department’s graduate and undergraduate students and a willingness to teach a variety of classes.

In addition to seeking out the types of teaching experiences I listed above, I also suggest preparing for your job talk by practicing it for different audiences and getting feedback from a variety of people (e.g., professors both within and outside of your specialty areas). If you didn’t have a lot of teaching experience in graduate school (which was the case for me), it may be especially important to present a polished job talk that displays relevant skills: clearly expressing and connecting ideas, engaging an audience, and responding well to questions.

Collegiality As is the case with most hiring decisions, people seriously consider whether the applicant would be a good colleague. By that, I mean someone who will contribute to the department and university in meaningful ways, act with integrity, and behave respectfully toward others. Evidence that someone is likely to make a good colleague can come from 1) showing interest and enthusiasm for other people’s work in your application and on the interview, 2) being polite and interactive during the interview, and 3) letters of recommendation touching upon your strong interpersonal skills.

For this component, my advice is to be mindful of the ways that you interact with your peers, professors, and others in graduate school, so that these individuals can attest to your collegiality. You can prepare for job interviews by seeking out opportunities to interact with professors and peers in your own department, communicating with conference attendees and presenters, etc. These type of experiences will help you to refine your professional interaction style and increase your comfort level.

Match Beyond the collegiality aspect mentioned above, your goals and priorities and how well they align with the department, your openness to potentially collaborating with others in the department, and your commitment to similar values as the department (e.g., prioritizing evidence-based treatments in clinical psychology programs that have a clinical scientist training model) will all be considered.

My advice is to look closely at information about the department, the faculty, and the university and highlight areas of fit in your cover letter and then expand upon them in more detail if you are invited for an interview. 

I enjoy being a professor and wrote this post to help others who are interested in becoming professors. The application process for these types of positions can be daunting. My hope is that this post makes typical areas that are considered for hiring more transparent, and that the advice will help you to prepare for the process.

Acknowledgements

I am grateful to my graduate school mentor, Dr. Thomas Joiner, for all of his excellent job-related advice. I also want to thank Brandon Saxton for giving me the idea for this post and for feedback on an early version.

NDSU at ABCT

I had the pleasure of attending the 49th Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies in Chicago over the past several days, and it was an excellent conference!

Four graduate students from the NDSU Psychological Clinical Science program presented their research. 

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Mun Yee Kwan, from our lab, presented on stress generation and bulimic symptoms (details forthcoming in a manuscript that was recently accepted by Journal of Affective Disorders).

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Brandon Saxton, from the Attention and Emotion Lab, presented on differences between anxiety and sadness with regard to dual-attention RSVP performance.

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Tharaki Siyaguna, from the Attention and Emotion Lab, presented on mindfulness moderating the influence of rumination on depression.

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Samantha Myhre, from the Attention and Emotion Lab, presented on trait mindfulness serving as a protective factor against depressive symptoms.

I had the opportunity to catch up with Brooke Ammerman, who was a research assistant and honors thesis student in our lab when she was an undergraduate. She is currently doing important work on nonsuicidal self-injury as a doctoral student at Temple University.brooke

I saw so many compelling presentations on groundbreaking research in the field, including two psychologists who have influenced me as a scientist, instructor, and clinician: Marsha Linehan and Scott Lilienfeld. They each have far too many contributions to list here, but Linehan is best known for creating, developing, and rigorously testing the revolutionary Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT). Lilienfeld is well-known for his prolific work identifying and calling out pseudoscience and articulating the importance of identifying and stopping harmful mental health practices, among many other contributions.

Some quotes from Linehan’s presentation (with the disclaimer that they are not exact, but rather paraphrased from the best of my memory and my notes):

  • On understanding the perspective of a client who is experiencing suicidal desire so that you can effectively intervene,”Suicide is viewed as a problem by the therapist and as a solution by the client.”
  • On dialectical thinking and the acknowledgement of multiple truths, “If you ask people what you get when you put black and white together, most will say that you get gray, but that’s not true. Black and white together makes plaid.”
  • On her clinical trial that dismantled different components of DBT to see which components were most impactful (e.g., skills group vs. individual therapy), “I try not to go into research thinking I know the answers because that’s when I usually get the worst outcomes. I was confident that the DBT skills reduced suicide attempts, but I wasn’t going to let people die to make a point. We made sure every client in our clinical trial had the formal DBT system of suicide risk assessment and prevention, regardless of group condition.”
  • A point that seems like it may be helpful for rumination prevention, “If your feelings fit the facts in a situation, you should use problem-solving. If your feelings don’t fit the facts, you should change the emotion through other methods.”

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Scott Lilienfeld and NDSU graduate student, Alisson Lass

Some quotes from Lilienfeld’s presentation (with the same disclaimer that I had for Linehan’s quotes):

  • On concern about certain branches of psychology reducing the number of statistics courses required in their graduate programs, “Statistics are the language of psychology.”
  • On the importance of including multilevel analyses of mental disorders such as sociocultural factors, he quoted George Graham, “Mental illness may be ‘in’ the brain, but not ‘of’ the brain.”
  • “Many people think the opposite, but a finding in a low-powered study is actually more likely to be a fluke than the other way around.”
  • “Descartes was so tall, that when he died, he didn’t fit in the casket. They had to cut his head off. In his death, he literally had mind-body dualism.”

We also met Judith Beck, who has made enormous contributions in the area of cognitive behavior therapy, which her father, Aaron Beck, created.

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And last, but not least, we ate some delicious food while we were there.

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the NDSU crew at Girl and the Goat

Data Blitz

Last Friday, the NDSU graduate students participated in a data blitz. They each presented their most exciting research findings from the previous year in 2-3 minutes and 2-3 slides. Below are pictures of our lab members’ presentations. Allison Minnich presented on gender differences in the impact of disordered eating on quality of life, Darren Carter presented on the relationship between alcohol and an aspect of suicidal behavior, and Mun Yee Kwan presented on factors related to suicidal desire among individuals experiencing eating disorder symptoms. It was a wonderful opportunity to see the exciting, diverse research that all of our graduate students are doing!

  Ally Darren Mun Yee Kwan

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